APA Testimony to US House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development

On March 13th, a member of the APA Legislative and Policy Committee offered written and oral testimony to the US House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (T-HUD).  During the testimony, APA called upon subcommittee members to increase funding for federal programs, such as CDBG, HOME, BUILD and transit capital grants.  To find out more about this testimony, please check out APA’s blog post here: https://planning.org/blog/blogpost/9173083/.  As a follow-up to this testimony, and since the Chair of the T-HUD Subcommittee is Congressman David Price from North Carolina, APA-NC President Ben Howell sent this letter to Chairman Price in support of APA’s...

2019 Marvin Collins Planning Awards – Call for Entries!

The 2019 Marvin Collins Planning Awards program is the 41st such program of the NC Chapter of the American Planning Association.  The awards recognize agencies and individuals that have completed outstanding plans, programs, and projects, have excelled as planning students, or have made notable contributions to the planning profession.  The awards represent the highest standards of achievement in the planning profession in North Carolina. The nominating period is now open and will close on March 31st, 2019.  Attached is the 2019 Call for Entries form.  Nominations will be reviewed by mid-June and awards will be presented during the 2019 APA NC Conference in Wilmington, October 8-11, 2019.  We look forward to another year of outstanding entries that reflect so positively on the great planning underway in North Carolina. As a special note to the universities, we look forward to these student awards and heightened internship collaborations. Download the form...

The City of Edinburgh, Scotland

Author: Roger Bardsley, AICP It is possible that some of you have been to Edinburgh, Scotland.  It is a beautiful city with loads of wonderful architecture, museums and history.  Edinburgh Castle sits on top of the ridge that runs through the center of town while Arthur’s Seat looks down from the other end.  The Firth of Forth is visible from the top, and the Royal Yacht Britannia is moored at the docks.  Yes, you should go. This blog, however, is not about the sights the tourists see.  It is about things that planners might notice.  I like to write about these sorts of things because you are all planners, and we know we don’t see the world the ways others do. Transit Edinburgh has an impressive bus system that serves much of the metro area with frequent, on-time service.  They have both double-decker and single-deck buses with plenty of capacity.  Unlike in cities in North Carolina, there is no class stigma attached to riding the bus.  A couple of years ago Edinburgh completed a tram from downtown to the airport.  I rode it in from the airport last week and enjoyed the experience.  The alignment, unfortunately, contained tight turns so the tram was not able to maximize its speed capabilities.  The tram was very controversial, over budget and behind schedule.  Sounds like every public project in the U.S.  In spite of the critique, however, I wish the major cities in NC had systems as capable as the one in Edinburgh.  Note:  Most of the buses in Edinburgh are operated by Lothian, a private company in operation since 1919.  It...

2019 Marvin Collins Planning Awards Program – Deadline Extended

Submitted by APA-NC Awards Committee The nominating period is now open for the 2019 Marvin Collins Planning Awards program. The Call for Entries form is available here, and the deadline is April 30, 2019. Nominations will be reviewed by mid-June and awards will be presented during the 2019 APA-NC Conference in Wilmington, October 8-11, 2019. Entering its 41st year, this awards program recognizes agencies and individuals that have completed outstanding plans, programs, and projects, as well as students and others who have made notable contributions within the planning profession.  The awards represent the highest standards of achievement in the planning profession in North Carolina. We look forward to another year of outstanding entries that reflect so positively on the great planning underway in North Carolina....

Most at Risk for Erasure from Climate Change

By: Amanda Martin, AICP, PhD Candidate at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Department of City and Regional Planning Up and down the coast of the Carolinas, the iconic seaside towns are facing a brutal storm. Their residents, restauranteurs, and local government staff are holding their collective breath to see what will be left after Hurricane Florence. They know what we all know now—the storm’s waves and wind will likely bring large scale destruction. Local and national media are covering Florence by breathlessly reporting from the water’s edge, while we nervously watch the waves crash behind them on the screen. Ironically, small, rural communities further inland may have more to lose in the changing climate. The drama of the destruction at the coast overshadows the deep vulnerability of communities that lie in the inner coastal plains of both the Carolinas – flat expanses of agricultural land and swamps that many people only see on their way to or from the coast itself. These areas sit downstream of large watersheds further upland. Their financial and political resources pale in comparison to coastal communities. Seven Springs, a tiny town in Wayne County, North Carolina, is such a town. Located on the Neuse River, it boasts natural springs it was named after. It was the site of a Civil War battle, and later home to two private resorts built over the springs.  Hurricane Floyd flooded almost every home in town in 1999, and as much as a third of the original population did not return to rebuild. In 2016, floodwater returned with Hurricane Matthew. Painstakingly, some houses have come back online....
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