Nominations Open for Marvin Collins Planning Awards

APA-NC’s annual awards program has changed its submittal deadline. Due to conflicts with APA’s annual National Conference and other awards programs that happen in the spring, the Awards Committee has decided to accept 2017 applications from mid-November, 2016 through January 31, 2017 instead of late spring as has been the case in the past. The 2017 Marvin Collins Planning Awards program is the 39th such program of the North Carolina Chapter of the American Planning Association (APA-NC) recognizing agencies and individuals that have completed outstanding plans, programs, and projects, have excelled as planning students, or have made notable contributions to the planning profession. The awards represent the highest standards of achievement in the planning profession in North Carolina. The late Marvin Collins developed the idea of an awards program in 1975 for the North Carolina Chapter of the American Institute of Planners, which preceded the NCAPA. He gained approval and assumed responsibility for establishing the program. Marvin received a Distinguished Professional Achievement Award from the NCAPA just prior to his death in 1998. In 2001, the NCAPA Executive Committee named the program in Marvin’s honor to recognize his service to the Chapter. The Outstanding Planning Awards for Small Communities are named in honor of the late Brian Benson, who was a strong advocate of planning for small communities. Brian served as NCAPA Vice President for Professional Development in the early 1990s. Download the nomination form for 2017. Award Nominations Must Be Postmarked by January 31, 2017. Award Categories Outstanding Planning Awards Comprehensive Planning To a plan, program or process of unusually high merit adopted or enacted in the current or past...

News Release: Centralina Health Solutions Coalition Receives Funding from the American Planning Association to Combat Chronic Disease

WASHINGTON, DC – The Centralina Health Solutions Coalition has received a $140,000 grant from the American Planning Association through its Plan4Health program to combat two determinants of chronic disease—lack of physical activity and lack of access to nutritious foods. Plan4Health is a multi-year program that strengthens the connection between planning and public health. Seventy-five percent of the program’s funding supports local and state coalitions working to advance public health through better planning and partnerships, specifically through leveraging skills and evidence-based strategies. The program is implemented in partnership with the American Public Health Association (APHA) and represents a major new collaboration between planners and public health professionals. Funding for Plan4Health was provided through an award from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “We are pleased to offer a second year of funding to local coalitions working to improve each of their community’s health,” said Anna Ricklin, AICP, manager of APA’s Planning and Community Health Center, which manages the Plan4Health program. “The funding provides fuel to address existing health concerns to create communities of lasting value that are equitable and healthy for all.” Seventeen coalitions were selected for the Plan4Health program after a competitive review process. The program is being administered through APA’s Planning and Community Health Center that is dedicated to integrating community health issues into local and regional planning practices by advancing research, outreach, education and policy. Centralina Health Solutions Coalition Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Centralina Health Solutions Coalition is working to increase physical activity among residents of Mecklenburg County, NC by implementing action plans that support a health in all policies approach.  By identifying and communicating...

ASU Students Gather to Learn About the Planning Profession

Written by Nicholas Stover, APA-NC Education Outreach Student Subcommittee Appalachian State University Representative On March 19th, 2015 the APA-NC Education and Outreach Committee organized a gathering of students at Appalachian State University (ASU) to meet with planning officials to learn about what planners do in the professional environment. As the ASU student representative on the APA-NC Education and Outreach Committee Subcommittee, I served as one of the primary coordinators of the effort. What the process entailed was my working with professors and planning officials to bring together a question and answer session that would shed some light into the inner workings of the planning field from a professional perspective. More specifically, my role was to act as a student liaison between those in the professional world and those in the academic world. I worked with several people in the process to bring the forum to fruition. Dr. Rich Crepeau served as a faculty liaison in the process, and was instrumental in bringing aboard planning officials from around the area, while my work focused on developing a flyer and getting the message out about the event. We had a turnout of around 23-25 students as well as a total of 7 planning officials: Bill Bailey – Planning Director for the town of Boone Joe Furman – Planning director for Watauga County Adam Stumb – Planning Director of Ashe County David Graham and Phil Trew both of the High Country Council of Governments APA NC Education and Outreach Committee Chair, Cynthia Jenkins from the City of Durham, and Vice Chair Ashley Clark from the University of North Carolina in Charlotte Urban Institute As...

APA-NC Celebrates Great Places at Town Hall Day

On March 18th, APA-NC celebrated Town Hall Day in Raleigh by joining with legislators to recognize the 2015 winners of the Great Places in North Carolina initiative. Senator Tamara Barringer and Representative Sarah Stevens welcomed all to the Legislative Building to celebrate the dynamic partnerships that bring together local and state governments. Program Chair Jason Burdette provided an overview of the Great Places in North Carolina program describing this year’s new categories: Great Greenways and Great Historic Rehabilitations. Incoming APA-NC Chapter President John Morck introduced all of the winning communities—Asheboro, Belmont, Goldsboro, Kinston, New Bern, Roanoke Rapids, and West Jefferson. Representatives from each community shared with those attendance a few words about what makes their respective place great. Behind every great place is North Carolinians working together to improve their community. APA-NC was pleased to join with legislators to celebrate these collaborative planning efforts. Legislators in attendance included Rep. Michael Wray, Rep. Pat Hurley, Rep. John Torbett, Rep. Dana Bumgardner, Rep. Allen McNeill, Rep. George Graham, Rep. Jonathan Jordan, Rep. Michael Speciale, Sen. Kathy Harrington, and Sen. Angela Bryant. North Carolina Secretary of Cultural Resources Susan Kluttz concluded the Great Places Legislative Event by highlighting the importance of restoring historic tax credits and developing planning partnerships to the creation of great...

Planners Discuss the Key To Attracting Millenials

What can communities do to help businesses attract the talent they need to succeed in a global economy? That’s the question that a group of planners sat down to discuss in Asheville, NC last week. The program at the Land of Sky Council of Governments was sparked by a 2014 poll conducted by Harris Interactive for APA of Millennials (ages 21 – 34), Gen Xers (ages 35 – 49), and Active Boomers (50 – 65) in North Carolina to find out their economic perceptions and community preferences. The survey found that nearly 70% of North Carolina millennials believe they are likely to move to another part of the state within the next five years. What would it take for them to either stay, or choose a particular city to live? According to the survey, safe streets, clean air and water, high-speed Internet, and infrastructure that supports a healthy lifestyle were all key factors in the decision. Interestingly, Active Boomers and Gen Xers also valued these community attributes. In Asheville, the issue of the “walkability” was one that came up repeatedly. A major component for many people’s choice on where to live, the ability to walk to restaurants and towns can be a benefit to be advertised, or a challenge that must be overcome. While some work has been done in the mountain region to increase accessibility, a lack of sidewalks continues to be a common complaint. To learn more about the discussion, check out the article on Asheville...

Assembly Line

Written by Chad Meadows APA-NC’s response to draft changes to Chapter 160A/153A NCGS. Hello NC Planners!  We at the Legislative Committee hope your holidays are going well. About two months ago, a series of land use attorneys began working with the North Carolina Bar Association to prepare revisions to portions of Chapter 160A and 153A. The idea was to simplify the state planning statutes, make them easier to read, and remove many of the current inconsistencies in the language. Copies of the proposed changes were sent to all local government attorneys across the state, and can be read and downloaded here. Several North Carolina planners have reviewed the draft changes from the NC Bar Association, and their comments have been sent to the NC Bar Association drafters for consideration. A copy of the memorandum can be seen here. A HUGE thank you to all the planners who contributed time and comments to this effort! Please note that the NC Bar Association is accepting comments on its proposed changes through December 31, 2014, so please feel free to forward any additional comments you may have directly to them. Feel free to contact me at chad@codewright.info if you need their contact information. The next step in the process is for the NC Bar Association drafters to work through the comments they receive and prepare a revised version of the proposed changes.  We expect the revised changes to be incorporated into a bill for consideration by the General Assembly in the 2015 session.  Rest assured we will be paying close attention to the bill’s language and progress, and will keep the chapter membership apprised of...
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