Announcing the Winners of the 2018 Marvin Collins Awards

Authors: Craig N. Benedict, AICP, Chair – APA-NC Awards Committee (East) Meredith Kern, Orange County Planning & Inspections Department The APA-NC Awards Committee is proud to announce the winners of the 2018 Marvin Collins awards. The Marvin Collins Planning Awards program recognizes agencies and students who have completed outstanding plans, programs, and projects, or made notable contributions to the planning profession. Each year the Awards Committee receives nominations in specific categories, which are then reviewed by a panel of independent planners representing eastern and western portions of the state. The awards signify the highest standards of achievement for planning in North Carolina. Recipients will be recognized at an awards luncheon on Thursday, September 13, 2018, at the APA-NC annual conference in Winston-Salem. And the award goes to… Outstanding Planning Award – Comprehensive Planning (Small Community) Transylvania County 2025 Comprehensive Plan   Outstanding Planning Award – Comprehensive Planning (Large Community) Plan Chatham County   Robert Reiman Award Scott Shuford   Student Awards              Appalachian State University – Abie Bonevac (Outstanding Student Award) East Carolina University – Plan 4096: Planning Studio (Undergraduate Student Project) University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill – Carly Hoffman (Outstanding Student Award)   Outstanding Planning Award – Special Theme Award: Multidisciplinary Project   Carolina Thread Trail Greater Charlotte Regional Freight Mobility Plan (multijurisdictional)   Outstanding Planning Award – Implementation (Small Community)   Town of Hillsborough Churton Street Access Improvement Project   Outstanding Planning Award – Implementation (Large Community) Wake Forest Renaissance Plan (Honorable...

Planners Discuss the Key To Attracting Millenials

What can communities do to help businesses attract the talent they need to succeed in a global economy? That’s the question that a group of planners sat down to discuss in Asheville, NC last week. The program at the Land of Sky Council of Governments was sparked by a 2014 poll conducted by Harris Interactive for APA of Millennials (ages 21 – 34), Gen Xers (ages 35 – 49), and Active Boomers (50 – 65) in North Carolina to find out their economic perceptions and community preferences. The survey found that nearly 70% of North Carolina millennials believe they are likely to move to another part of the state within the next five years. What would it take for them to either stay, or choose a particular city to live? According to the survey, safe streets, clean air and water, high-speed Internet, and infrastructure that supports a healthy lifestyle were all key factors in the decision. Interestingly, Active Boomers and Gen Xers also valued these community attributes. In Asheville, the issue of the “walkability” was one that came up repeatedly. A major component for many people’s choice on where to live, the ability to walk to restaurants and towns can be a benefit to be advertised, or a challenge that must be overcome. While some work has been done in the mountain region to increase accessibility, a lack of sidewalks continues to be a common complaint. To learn more about the discussion, check out the article on Asheville...
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