Opportunity to Participate in 2017 APA National Planning Conference Session

Author Pete Sullivan, AICP Co-Chair, APA-NC Communications and Public Affairs Committee Are you planning to attend the National Planning Conference in New York, May 6-9, 2017? Read below for details on how you can help facilitate a conference session on diversity in planning. The organizer of one of the confirmed conference sessions, Cultural Competency in Planning, is seeking volunteers to help facilitate the interactive session. The purpose of the session is to help attendees plan for cultural competency in their local communities. The format will include 16 rotating stations, where attendees pose questions to subject matter experts on a range of diversity-related topics. The organizer, Diana Hasrouni, is seeking volunteer subject matter experts for the following topics: Affordable Housing Urban Design Arts, Culture, and Placemaking Community Development Crime Prevention Diversity in the Planning Profession and Education Economic Development Education Environmental Justice Ethnic Enclaves Food Insecurity Planning at the Local Level and Inclusive Engagement Public Health Public and Active Transportation Urban Design Zoning/Ethics/Law If interested, send an email to Diana Hasrouni at hasrounidana@gmail.com. Include your name and contact information, and indicate three topics from the list above that you would be interested in leading. Volunteers should have some professional experience in their chosen topics. The deadline for responses is Friday, February 24, 2017. About the session Cultural Competency in Planning is scheduled for Saturday, May 6, 2017, 2:30pm – 3:45pm. The session will be held at the main conference location below. 1.25CM credits are available. Jacob K. Javits Convention Center 655 W. 34th St. New York, NY 10001 More information on this session is available in the #NPC17 conference program...

Register for the Social Sustainability Conference in Charlotte, June 8-10

The fourth annual conference for the Integrated Network for Social Sustainability (INSS) will be held in Charlotte June 8-10, at Center City Campus, UNC-Charlotte. Registration is free, but we ask that you please register. You can do so here. At our Wednesday evening kick-off event (6-8 p.m.) we’ll be screening a film called “Ground Work” which features social justice and environmental advocates from Philadelphia. Watch the preview of the film here. The creator of the film will be joining us. Refreshments will be served. Thursday’s events (9 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.) feature our keynote speaker Timothy Beatley (12pm), a discussion of social mobility in Charlotte (3:30), and a panel discussion on accessible transportation (6:00). Refreshments will be served throughout the day. Our Friday program (10 a.m. – 3 p.m.) begins with breakfast at 10am, followed by a panel on the topic of “Invisible Disasters” that features speakers from all over the country and some from Charlotte. Please view our program to see the full program schedule for the...

Rally to Restore the NC Historic Tax Credit

  On Wednesday, August 12, APA-NC President John Morck, Past President Ben Hitchings, and other N.C. planners and historic preservationists went to the Historic Statehouse in Raleigh to attend a press event calling for the restoration of the North Carolina Historic Tax Credit. The Historic Tax Credit has provided $1.6 billion in investment in cities and towns to restore historic structures and revitalize main streets and downtown areas across the state since 1998. Planners and other historic preservation advocates then visited legislators to encourage North Carolina state senators to follow the lead of their counterparts in the House, who overwhelmingly passed House Bill 152 to restore the credit. APA-NC members were well represented at the event, including Annette Stone from Carrboro, Kermit Skinner and Erin Burke from Manteo, Craig Harmon from Fayetteville, and Kimberly Van Dyk and LuAnn Monson from Wilson. Planners and local leaders are encouraged to reach out to their legislators to let them know how the Historic Tax Credit has helped catalyze private investment, create jobs, and revitalize main streets and downtowns in their community. Please thank House members for passing H.152 to restore the Historic Tax Credit, and encourage Senators to take up the bill and pass it. Communities large and small across the state need this tool to help ensure their economic success in the years ahead!...

August’s Civic by Design Forum: Streetcar Funride!

Written by Tom Low Seventy-seven Years after Its Early Heyday, Can the Streetcar Shape How Charlotteans Live Once Again? Image: Streetcar and tracks along Elizabeth Avenue Many of Charlotte’s close-in neighborhoods, such as Myers Park, Dilworth and Plaza-Midwood, were suburbs planned along streetcar routes extending from Charlotte’s Trade and Tryon Streets. These neighborhoods were expressly designed to provide all their residents an easy walk to the streetcar, giving them the tranquil and walkable attributes they have today. Even Myers Park’s quirky street map, whose signature roads follow the wide medians upon which the tracks were formerly laid (not the paved lanes!) bears the lasting imprint of the streetcar. Seventy-seven years since the last run of the streetcar that served it, streetcar service was restored a few weeks ago to one of these neighborhoods, the Elizabeth Community. Join us in front of Earl’s Grocery at Elizabeth Avenue to review the legacy of the streetcar in Elizabeth and nearby Myers Park with Levine Museum’s resident historian Tom Hanchett. We will then enjoy a ride on the Gold Line. Along the way, we will meet with Kati Stegall of CATS Art in Transit to hear about the work that went in to creating the attractive artwork on the Gold Line shelter glass windscreens. We will return to Elizabeth on the Gold Line to conclude our evening celebrating the return of the streetcar to Charlotte at the Spoke Easy, a new kind of hangout that typifies in several ways how Charlotte is remaking itself once again. CIVIC BY DESIGN FORUM Presented with Levine Museum of the New South Tuesday, August 11, 2015 |...

Planning for Prosperity kicks off 2015 season with Small is Big!

On June 17th, 180 planners and manufacturing innovators from across the state gathered in Greensboro to learn more about the emerging trends associated with small scale manufacturing. The session served as the kick-off event for NCAPA’s 2015 Planning for Prosperity initiative. Following a welcome from NCAPA President John Morck, the day-long session featured nationally recognized small scale manufacturing expert Ilana Preuss of Recast City. Ms. Preuss shared a national perspective on the changing nature of manufacturing, and examples of successful strategies cities are using to support the new production economy. The presentation highlighted the importance of integrating local policies and programs to focus on housing, workforce development and economic development in a cohesive manner. Best-selling author Beth Macy provided the lunch keynote about her book, Factory Man. Her presentation focused on the real life characters that influenced the writing of the book and the long-lasting community impacts that off-shoring has had in southern Virginia that resonated with many participants facing some of the same challenges in North Carolina. Panel sessions focused on the support system of programs and spaces and a group of small manufacturers. Panelists addressed their experiences, barriers they encountered, and shared ways the planning community can play a positive role in supporting smaller scale manufacturing, and what they need planners to know about the changing nature of work spaces. The day wrapped up with a cross-section of planning directors from the Piedmont region reflecting on what they heard over the course of the day, and how they are positioning their communities to prepare for this shift in manufacturing. Thank you to Action Greensboro, Piedmont Together, and...

Announcing the Civic by Design Forum on July 14, 2015

Written by Tom Low Image:  Student’s work for the University City, Charlotte, North Carolina Master Plan project It will be interesting to highlight the theory of Landscape Urbanism while focusing on the site specific project of the University City regeneration master plan. The University City area is predominately sprawl and in the path of the next light rail line extension and more intensive development. The student’s work reflects urban design qualities that expand on core Landscape Urbanism principles lead by landscape urbanist Professor Ming-Chun Lee and faculty. It will be interesting to see how the work attempts to integrate ecology with community design. Part of the discussion is about how this newly emerging practice can be better integrated with other traditional practices in the field of urban design such as New Urbanism. As you know this is a particular interest of mine with my work on Light Imprint as a way to integrate the ecological performance of Landscape Urbanism with New Urbanism’s strengths of walkability, connectivity, block structure, mixed-use, housing choice, rural-to-urban transect, human-scale neighborhoods, the art of place-making, etc. On occasion, during the academic year, I have participated as a visiting critic. The monthly Forum — in our eleventh year — generally draws 1/3 regular folks, 1/3 local leaders and grass roots advocates, and 1/3 design professionals/students. Given our current environmental predicament and never-ending urban sprawl, the challenge for urban designers is to find ways to revive, redefine the existing urban form that spreads around us. Perhaps, through the eyes of our mother nature, the forgiving landscape may offer us some clues. Urban landscape systems encompass a wide spectrum of green elements at different geographic scales,...
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